Moderation in all Things?

2 Corinthians 5:6-17 I just got back from a week of backpacking with Wilderness Trail – an experience that always teaches me things.  I learn things about creation, like:  you can use the bark of a birch tree as kindling to start a fire.  I learn things about God, like:  that “peace that passes understanding” is a real thing, evidenced by feeling strangely peaceful while your stuff is getting soaked in a rainstorm.  And I learn things about myself, like: I’m too attached to my phone. This hit me on the first day.  We got to our first intersection, which meant we’d stand around for just a few moments getting out water bottles and waiting on each other.  Recognizing that 60 seconds of lag time, I began to move my arm toward my back right pocket. In the middle of the wilderness, I was reaching for my non-existent phone. I made that ridiculous, almost-unconscious move for my phone a couple times on the first day.  But after that the backpacking experience worked its magic.  My mind let go of my cell phone (and everything else) and thought mostly about the uphill climb or the wonder of fireflies or how good mac-n-cheese can taste when you’re really hungry.  I laughed and struggled and reflected with the amazing youth and adults in our group.  For the better part of a week, I was mostly uncomfortable but also mostly peaceful and content. On Friday morning we loaded up our van and headed back into civilization.  My phone sprung back to life as we returned to cell service.  Little red dots told me...

Sacred Heart of Jesus

Matthew 22:37-40 I really like Jesus – you may already know that about me.  What you might not know is that I also really like art; I went to a high school where you had something like majors, and art was mine.  A few years ago I came across something that merged these two loves of mine.  It’s a Catholic tradition called the “Sacred Heart of Jesus.” Sacred Heart of Jesus, Pompeo Batoni, 1767Given that I have some training in both Christianity and art, naturally I had a very profound first impression to this particular genre of artwork: “EW!” The Sacred Heart of Jesus can’t be traced back to a clear starting point.  There was Saint Margaret Mary Alacoque in the 1600s, who saw Jesus and heard him speak:  “Behold the Heart that has so loved men. …Instead of gratitude I receive from the greater part (of humankind) only ingratitude.”  There was Saint Bonaventure in the 1200s who wrote, “Who is there who would not love this wounded heart? Who would not love in return Him, who loves so much?”  And long before that, there was a Christ who died on the cross as a perfect sacrifice; the one who was pierced in his side (all the way to the heart?); the one who loved us enough to give his whole life for us. Out of all that comes the Sacred Heart of Jesus – and its corresponding artwork. The Sacred Heart of Jesus, Josef Mehoffer, 1911But it’s strange, right?  Most of these are not cartoonish, Valentine’s Day hearts.  They’re biological and bloody and graphic.  They have arteries that should...